Brad Carlin on Medium.com: Three Characteristics of a Good Statistical Consultant

Statistical consulting can be a very rewarding and lucrative career path for those interested in data and statistics. However, this field of work requires a skill set that often isn’t taught in most undergraduate and graduate statistics programs.

When considering a career in statistical consulting, it’s important to acknowledge that having a solid understanding of statistical methods and theories is the bare minimum — and that a great statistician does not necessarily make a great statistical consultant. Consulting requires a separate non-technical skill set that needs to be developed and honed over time.

Checkout the full Medium Article below:

https://medium.com/@brad_carlin/brad-carlin-three-characteristics-of-a-good-statistical-consultant-53e5151445b2

Brad Carlin – “Take Two” – Original Composition

New original composition: “Take Two”
Music and Lyrics by Brad Carlin
All parts played or sung by Brad Carlin *except* tenor saxophone, played by Austin Albert

This song is about making the most of second acts in one’s life. Obviously there is a lot of duality in the song. The main theme in the chorus is just two notes, which are then repeated in the backing vocals (which are sung in two-part harmony). The saxophone echos in this section add a new form of duality. Lyrically, all of the lines in the song rhyme with “two”, something I initially resisted, but finally decided to make into a fun exercise with the help of an online rhyming dictionary. I’m kind of proud of the reference to John and Abigail Adams in the second verse, which was inspired by my family’s annual July 4 viewing of the movie musical “1776”. The last verse also pays tribute to the song “Unknown”, written by my fellow Homeward Bound band member, Susan Thompson.

For more on Homeward Bound and its music please see: homewardboundband.com

Brad Carlin: Four Tips to Make Your Band’s Next Show a Success

Establishing a local band in your hometown or city can be a surprisingly daunting task. This is especially true if you’re in a new city where you don’t have an established family, friend, or musician network. Regardless of where your band’s looking to get started, having the right approach combined with a little (OK, maybe a lot of) persistence can help you start booking more venues and playing more shows.

Here are a few simple tips to help you get started:

Don’t Play Too Often

The instinct for many bands just starting out is to play any show that they can get. While building your experience and exposure is a good thing, too much exposure can actually hinder your band’s growth. You want your audience to feel a sense of urgency when you put on a show, as if missing that night’s show means not being able to see your band for several more weeks. If you’re playing the same venue too often, you may end up making your band too accessible, which could actually hurt your attendance.

Start Small

Playing in an over-sized, half empty room isn’t fun for either the audience or the band. When targeting venues to play, aim for those you are confident you can fill with friends, family, and fans. As your audience grows, you can begin booking larger venues.

Think Diversity

This applies to all aspects of the experience:  the type of music, the type of venue, and perhaps most crucially, the composition of the band itself.  Bands that feature multiple lead vocalists and multiple featured soloists are inherently more interesting.  On the venue side, while the lure of downtown venues and hip nightspots is strong, don’t summarily reject fundraiser and other private gigs; while their exposure they offer may be more limited, it’s still good for networking and an opportunity to see what material works best where.  

Collaborate with Other Local Musicians and Bands

Networking is a huge part of the music industry at every level. Networking with venues, musicians, and other local residents is crucial to your band’s success. Try to attend other musicians’ shows and get to know the local players in your town or city. Once you’ve identified a few bands or musicians that you think might be a good fight, ask them if they’d like to collaborate or do a guest performance. This is a great way to give your own fans something different, as well as expose your band to a different following.

Brad Carlin and Homeward Bound perform “Shame on the Moon” by Bob Seger

“Shame on the Moon”, by Bob Seger, performed by Homeward Bound during the Hearts and Hammers “Spring RAG” fundraiser at Surly Brewing Company in Minneapolis, MN on Friday, Apr 26, 2019.

Homeward Bound is Brad Carlin (guitar, piano and vocals), Josh Carlin (drums), Heather Succio (piano, mandolin and vocals), Susan Thompson (guitar and vocals), and Jim VerBout (bass guitar).

band’s website:  homewardboundband.com

New Trend: Utilizing Music Therapy in the Workplace

For many decades Music Therapy has been widely practiced within the medical community as a method of addressing numerous health concerns and ailments. More recently, the practice of utilizing music therapy for other applications has become more widespread.1 One particular field that has been rapidly growing within recent years is the application of Music Therapy in the workplace.

Many employers have recognized the benefits of offering Music Therapy as a way to help promote health and wellness among their employees. When facilitated by a qualified Music Therapist, both passive (listening and enjoying) and active (playing and creating) Music Therapy has been shown to boost employee morale, promote collaboration, and improve overall productivity within the workplace.

Here’s a quick look at some of the most common benefits of Music Therapy in the workplace:

Improves Productivity

Trained Music Therapists can help teach your employees how to intentionally use music throughout their workday to help improve their mood, focus, and productivity at work.2

Promotes Health and Wellness

Recent research has specifically detailed the health and wellness benefits of Music Therapy when used within a medical setting. In the workplace, Music Therapy can help to reduce stress, improve moods, and boost employee’s immune systems.3

Increases Collaboration

Playing, listening, and creating music in a team environment can help your employees to connect more deeply and promotes better communication among your employees.4
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1. [https://www.musictherapy.org/about/history/

2. [https://content.iospress.com/articles/work/wor01410]

3. [https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=566436047272311;res=IELHEA]

4. [https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08098130609478159]